TEACHING

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CHBS Building

Office Hours:

CHBS Building | Office 5311

MWF: By appointment

 

CRJU 691: Public Policy and Criminal Justice (graduate), Radford University (Summer 2018): This course explores two topics: (1) Dysfunction in the criminal justice system regarding fairness and equality before the law, and (2) the process of policy analysis that might lead to practical reforms preventing injustice.

CRJU 655: Constitutional Law and the Criminal Justice System (graduate), Radford University (Spring 2018): This course examines issues in constitutional law (primarily the Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Amendments) and criminal justice—particularly with respect to law enforcement and courts.

POSC 439: Constitutional Law: Civil Liberties, Radford University (Spring 2018): The objective of this course is to examine the theoretical bases, popular support, judicial interpretation, and role of civil liberties in the United States.

POSC 438: Constitutional Law: Government Powers, Radford University (Fall 2017): The objective of this course is to examine the constitutional powers exercised by the federal government.  The emphasis will be on intergovernmental relations, separation of powers, the role of the Supreme Court in constitutional process, and general theories of constitutional government.

CRJU 360: Criminal Law and Evidence, Radford University (Fall 2016, Spring 2017, Fall 2017): Course description: The objective of this course is to examine one of the central questions raised by criminal law: What are the just standards for criminal liability?  In seeking answers to this question, the course explores the nature of criminal law and the basic requirements and scope of criminal liability.  Specific topics will include the essential elements of crimes, the significance of harm, inchoate offenses, justification defenses, excuse defenses, and the relationship between crime and morality.  These topics are covered through reading about actual legal cases

CRJU 233: Courts and the Criminal Process, Radford University (Fall 2016, Spring 2017): Course description: This course examines four components of our legal system: (1) The nature and structure of the judiciary, (2) the nature and structure of the criminal process, (3) judicial review, and (4) legal interpretation.  The first two components cover a variety of topics relevant to courts and the criminal process generally, while the last two components focus upon the U.S. Supreme Court.

PHIL 1510: Legal and Moral Culpability, University of Virginia (summer 2016): Course description: The objective of this course is to examine one of the central philosophical questions raised by criminal law: What are the just standards for criminal liability?  For example, is legal culpability for inchoate offenses (those that may involve no harm) and strict liability offenses (those that may involve not fault) morally justified?  If so, what sorts of standards ought to be used?  More generally, what sorts of mental states and physical acts justify one’s criminal liability, and in what way do those mental states and physical acts relate to moral culpability?  These and other questions will be addressed through a careful reading of actual legal cases that draw out the implications of legal and philosophical theory. Syllabus

PHIL 1510: Philosophy of Law, University of Virginia (summer 2015): Course description: The objective of this course was to examine the philosophical underpinnings of four core areas of common law: Contract, Property, Tort, and Criminal Law. The course covered the landmark cases from each area–focusing upon philosophical analysis and moral evaluation of the law–and began with a discussion of liberalism, constitutional law, and the “Hart-Dworkin Debate.” Syllabus

PHIL 1510: Philosophy of Criminal Law, University of Virginia (spring 2015): Course description: The objective of this course was to examine the philosophical underpinnings of both criminal law and procedure, covering the landmark cases in each area. The substantive sections emphasized human nature and social norms, while the procedural sections emphasized criminal justice.  Syllabus

PHIL 2060: Philosophical Problems in Law (TA), University of Virginia (spring 2014): Course description:  This course focused on such problems as the nature and extent of legal liability, strict liability statutes, “Good Samaritan” laws, the legal enforcement of community moral standards, and the justification of punishment and capital punishment.

PHIL 2770: Political Philosophy (TA), University of Virginia (fall 2013): Course description: This course examined several of the most important problems in political philosophy, including the justification of the state, the problem of political obligation, the requirements of social justice, the justification of democracy, the state’s right to punish, property rights, and the duties of states to those outside their borders.